Information, Answers & Reviews

Hillbilly Elegy

Many in the media and politics keep trying to figure out why our new President attracts so many Rust Belt and Appalachian voters. This memoir of a young man’s coming of age in both regions may offer some insight.

At only thirty-one, J.D. Vance admits he's way too young to have penned a memoir. He hasn’t done anything extraordinary (though he did graduate from Yale Law School, a major accomplishment for a kid from a single-parent home in a working-class town in Ohio, where many did not finish high school).

Vance writes most vividly of Jackson, his dirt-poor but beautiful ancestral home in the mountains of eastern Kentucky. He also describes his people: a great-grandmother who once killed someone, and his own Mamaw who often threatens to do the same to her husband when he comes home drunk. In fact, J.D. relates, one night he saves his Pawpaw after Mamaw poured gasoline over him and lights a match.

What's New at the Library? Always Know with Automatic Notifications

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PHOTO: VERKEORG

Author Alert and New Arrivals, two great free services from the Library, keep you up on all the books, movies, and music as they're added to our collection. I use both of these all the time for the latest by my favorite authors and filmmakers, and they're great for personalized updates with minimal effort—I just set up my accounts, chose my preferences, and now get them automatically. These services also allow me to place holds on items as they're purchased by the Library, instead of waiting for them to hit the shelves.

Review: Universal Harvester

This is the second novel from Bloomington-born author John Darnielle, known also for the past twenty-five years as the songwriter in his band the Mountain Goats. While Universal Harvester’s trailer video [YouTube] suggests a horror story, the only slight chills come from the unexpected shifts between third and first person narration. And the eeriness is almost comforting, providing a profound depth and hopefulness to lives that may outwardly appear unremarkable.

Online Learning Made Easy

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One simple fact about the modern world is that the need for learning never ends. Another simple fact? The cost of learning keeps going up. As the Rolling Stones once said:

What can a poor boy do
Except play in a rock and roll band . . .

Nowadays, a poor boy can also go to Lynda.com through the Library’s website and, with just his Library card barcode number, learn the basics of music— and how to play it, record it, and promote it. And that’s just the beginning of what he can learn with Lynda.com's high-quality, self-paced online video lessons.

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